Introduction to video production

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Course content

Intermediate
March 05, 2018
2
mins
Average: 5 (10 votes)
Video is a powerful way to tell stories and deliver messages. Ninety per cent of the information sent to the brain is visual, and studies show people process visual information sixty thousand times faster than they process words. It’s estimated that 1 minute of video can be the equivalent of 1.8 million words.

In this course we explore the use of video and consider the various elements you need to think about before, during and after the filming process. Film and video have their own language, and one of the best ways to learn is to experiment. Here we provide you with some tips and hints you need to think about before you start the process.
Hi and welcome to Lumin. Video is a powerful way to tell stories and deliver messages. Ninety per cent of the information sent to the brain is visual and studies show people process visual information sixty thousand times faster than they process words. It is estimated that one minute of video alone can be the equivalent of one point eight million words.

I’m Andy Lima, Director of Creative and Interactive at Think HQ. I have worked in the creative industry for over 15 years and I have explored a range of mediums, including film and video. In this course, we’ll cover the basic stages of video production and a number of considerations to make when you’re producing video content – be it for your website, social media channels – or any other way in which you want to explore this very powerful medium.

But first, you need to think about why you are producing a video. What is your content? Who is the audience? How will they access the content you’re producing? And what message do you want them to take away after viewing? Video uses moving images and audio to tell a story, so work out what story you are willing to tell – and how it will be told.

Film and video have their own language, and while several elements come into play, the best way to learn, is by doing it. When creating visual information in film video format, you will need to think about the visual style, the look and feel you want to imprint in your production. What sort of production values do you want, and what equipment do you need to achieve those values? Do you have the equipment you need, or will you need to purchase or hire it? What is the set up? Will you need lighting? What about audio recording?

With the advance of technology, today we have access to a range of devices that we can use to produce quality video content, from smartphones to professional digital cameras. Whilst they offer different features and outcomes, they all can be used to great extent if your story is well defined and your production values are clear.

Whatever equipment you’re opting for, do you, or others within your organisation, have the expertise to use it effectively? Or will you require the services of experts such as camera operators and sound recordist? Maybe a full production crew? What about editing the footage and finalising the final production?

And the most important question of all – what is your budget? It will determine the style of your video and at what level you operate in all stages of video production.

So there’s a lot to think about! Next lesson, we'll explore the idea of storytelling.

About the instructor

Andy Lima

Andy is an award winning branding and communications professional with 15 years of experience providing strategic planning, creative direction and implementation of projects and campaigns across advertising, events, film and digital. Andy has delivered creative services for several Fortune 500 companies including IBM, Novartis, Nestlé and Caterpillar, helping to shape their brands and communications. He is also a successful producer – his short film, Mrs McCutcheon, won Best Australian Short Film at the Melbourne International Film Festival, and was nominated for an AFI AACTA.